Tag Archives: Tax Refund

IRS Refund Schedule Updated

We updated our IRS E-File Cycle Chart today to account for the IRS changing the payout dates from Thursday to Wednesday. Check out the changes and please let us know if you find any problems.

2015 IRS Tax Refund Schedule.

Having trouble with the IRS Where’s My Refund tool? Here are some handy tools to decipher your way around this.

How to read your IRS tax account transcript.

Tax Topic 151

Tax Topic 152

Tax Topic 203

Tax Topic 452

 

 

Other helpful tools:

Where’s My State Refund? State Tax Return Information

Estimate your tax return online

File your Taxes for Free Online

Affordable Care Act and It’s affect on your taxes

 

Updated for the 2014 Tax Year (2015 Tax Season)

One of the most pressing questions in the life of an early tax filer – when can I expect my tax refund to come? Before e-filing, this was always difficult to predict. First, you mail in your return. Then someone inputs all your information (and later, computers scanned in your information), then the Treasury had to issue a check, which was then mailed to you. Now, with a free IRS e-file, you can get your refund in as little as 8 days from when you file, if you elect for direct deposit.

For 9 out of 10 taxpayers, the IRS issued refunds in less than 21 days from the date the return was received last year.

For the 2015 tax filing season, the IRS announced that it will start accepting eFile and paper returns on January 20, 2015. You can find the press release here.

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2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart

2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart for Tax Year 2014

2014 IRS E-File Cycle ChartThis is a schedule for 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart. Direct Deposit and Check date’s below. Please see disclaimer. 2015 tax refund schedule is listed below for information purposes. This is just for the first week. Find out when you’re state income tax refund will be in. Please consider donating $1 to $5 to us for help with cost of running the site. If you use our schedule on your webpage, please drop us a link. January 23rd, 2015 is the first day of tax season 2015. The I.R.S will begin accepting tax returns January 23rd, 2015.

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Why is my 2014 tax refund still processing

Why is my 2014 refund still processing?

2014 IRS Tax Refund Schedule wrong for you?

By the stats, the current tax season has been quite a success. The Internal Revenue Service is reporting that, despite an abbreviated season, they are processing tax returns and issuing tax refunds at a much faster pace than last year. Why is my 2014 refund still processing?

Of course, all of the numbers in the world don’t matter when the one number you’re counting on – your own refund – is affected.

This season, I’ve heard from a number of taxpayers experiencing tax refund delays (though certainly nothing near last year’s education credit snafu). Initially, the trouble seemed to focus on those 1121 codes. The IRS was made aware of the problem and did issue a statement, saying:

A very small percentage of taxpayers may see an 1121 reference number if they check “Where’s My Refund?” after they initially were provided a projected refund date by the tool. The IRS is aware of this situation, and emphasizes that the small group of taxpayers who see this reference number should continue checking Where’s My Refund for an update. If we need more information to process their return, we will contact them — usually by mail.

Most of the taxpayers who reached out to me regarding the 1121 issue have since reported that they’ve either received their refunds or updated information about the delay.

However, shortly after the 1121 issue was made public, the focus from taxpayers on social media – and in emails, direct messages and private messages to me – has zeroed in on another code that’s popping up over and over: TC 570. There is a notable difference between the 1121 code and the TC 570: the latter is not an explicit refund code. It appears not on the “Where’s My Refund?” tool but on a taxpayer’s transcript. That’s an important distinction.

I reached out to IRS to find out whether there was any sort of systemic issue causing taxpayers to see a TC 570 on their transcript. So far, the answer to that question is no. The IRS is, however, clearly aware of the concerns and had this to say:

A Transaction Code 570 can mean different things in different cases so a taxpayer should not try to draw a conclusion based on the presence of a TC 570. The Transaction Code 570 will stop a refund from being issued until the impact of the action being taken on the account and the refund is determined and processed. Transaction Codes are used internally by the IRS to identify a transaction, adjust and research tax accounts and to maintain a history of actions posted to a taxpayer’s account. While they are reflected on transcripts they are not reflected on most public facing documents or tools like Where’s My Refund because they are difficult to interpret and can have different meaning depending on the case and associated codes and files. Again, the best way for taxpayers to check the status of their refund is by going to Where’s My Refund.

It’s a statement worth repeating. The IRS uses a lot of internal codes on transcripts and they can mean different things. And what it means exactly isn’t always apparent to the person taking the call at IRS. Does that suck? Of course it does. Trust me. I’ve been on the end of those calls trying to decipher what’s going on for taxpayers. And I totally believe that taxpayers are calling IRS and getting two or three different answers about the status of their refund. And I believe that taxpayers deserve a better answer.

But I would caution taxpayers not to try and pick apart their tax transcripts in an effort to find answers. There is no “one size fits all” answer to the TC 570 – not even in the best of circumstances. It does not necessarily equate, as some have surmised, an audit. Nor does it means, as others have posited, that the refund is subject to an offset. It could mean those things – but again, you’re not going to be able to tell from a glimpse at your transcript this early in the season.

Those codes? They don’t always mean what you think they mean.

I know that isn’t the answer that taxpayers want to hear. And trust me, I am continuing to pester IRS about these issues (believe me when I say that they have my number). But it’s not a certainty that a TC 570 on your transcript is anything sinister at this stage of the season. The data doesn’t appear to support it. And if there’s a real problem with your specific return, you’ll hear from IRS.

And yes, there have been problems. I have confirmed reports that a glitch in at least one program has resulted in the issuance of paper checks instead of direct deposit. Errors – mostly transposition of numbers – have slowed processing of other returns. There have been bounces for bad addresses. Returns have been held because of prior years when no returns were filed. And yes, identity theft continues to be a big problem especially when SocialSecurity numbers for dependents have appeared on more than one return. Clearly, not everyone is having a smooth tax season.

By the numbers, however, most taxpayers are getting their refunds as quickly as anticipated. On average, the IRS expects to issue tax refund checks to 9 of 10 taxpayers in 21 days or less. Those are pretty good odds. But that still means that 1 in 10 taxpayers will receive refund checks after that 21 day window. That sounds like a pretty small number until you calculate the total against the number of refunds issued. The IRS expects to process about 140 million tax returns this season. In 2013, they issued more than 100 million tax refund checks. If 1 in 10 taxpayers get their refunds after 21 days, that still works out to about 10 million taxpayers. That’s more than the individual populations of 42 states. It’s more than the combination populations of Alabama and South Carolina, the 23rd and 24th most populous states. So, yes, it’s a lot. But the number of taxpayers who do receive their refunds within that 21 day window? That’s more than the combined populations of our most populous states (California, Texas and Florida) or more astoundingly, the combined population of 25 of our least populous states.

Does that help those taxpayers who are depending on refund checks that have not yet been deposited? Of course not. I know you want your money. And I know that in many cases, you’re depending on that money. But work through the right channels. Keep checking the “Where’s My Refund?” tool for information. If you are advised to call the IRS, do so. If you get mail from IRS, open it. But at this stage, it truly is a waiting game. If I hear anything further (and I am pursuing these issues), rest assured that I will post it as soon as it becomes available.

Discuss this and more on the Income Tax Forums.

Need help preparing your 2014 Tax Return? Visit Hot Springs Tax Services.

IRS already cut billions in tax refund checks

Millions of taxpayers have already received big refund checks, as the 2014 tax filing season seems to be humming along without a hitch. IRS issuing many refund checks already.

The Internal Revenue Service announced today that it issued $64.5 billion in refunds to 19.5 million taxpayers as of Feb. 7, a total dollar amount that was up 24% from the same time last year. The average refund check issued this year, $3,317, is also 4.6% larger than last year.
It’s not too surprising that this filing season is running more smoothly than last year, when the IRS lagged the previous year’s pace for issuing refunds throughout most of the filing season. The agency had to put off accepting certain tax forms until as late as March because it was updating its systems following the tax-code revamps caused by the fiscal-cliff legislation.

But taxpayers are also submitting their returns more quickly. The IRS received more than 27 million returns as of Feb. 7, up 2.5% from the same time in 2013. Nearly 96% of those were filed electronically. Samuel Hale, 21, a college student near Fort Worth, Texas, says his refund was deposited into his checking account Friday morning, a week after he filed his return electronically using online software. “I was very surprised,” says Hale, who couldn’t file his return until April last year because of a missing W-2 form.

In an interesting shift, the data shows more taxpayers are doing their own returns so far this tax season. Roughly half of the returns submitted, or 13.3 million, were self prepared, up 14.7% from last year. Typically, about 60% of returns are handled by a tax pro, according to IRS data.

Of course, not all taxpayers have been able to file their returns yet. Some people are still waiting on paperwork from their brokers, employers or colleges that they need to report all income and claim certain tax breaks. And some people aren’t eager to file their returns. Taxpayers who need to cut a check to the IRS generally wait until closer to April 15 to file.

Taxpayers can track their refunds using the “Where’s My Refund?” tool starting 24 hours after filing electronically, or four weeks after mailing in a return. About 90% of refunds are issued within 21 days, though some may be delayed if there is an issue with the return.

Discuss this and more on the Income Tax Forums.

FIRST IRS 2014 DIRECT DEPOSITS JUST WENT OUT

FIRST IRS 2014 DIRECT DEPOSITS JUST WENT OUT.

February 6th, 2014, 12:00A.M. the I.R.S. sent out thousands of tax payments to individuals who filed before January 31st, 2014. Some individuals who filed before January 31st, 2014 were not included in this due to the overflow of individuals who submitted their returns. Those individuals should watch the Where’s My Refund page and expect a payout on the next payout day being “on or before February 13th, 2014.”

Please reply to this post when you submitted, were accepted, approved, and if you received your refund last night.

IRS deadline for claiming 2009 Income Tax Refunds approaching.

The deadline for filing your 2009 Income Tax Refund is steadily approaching.

The IRS deadline for claiming 2009 Income Tax refund checks is April 15th, 2013. You will need to paper file your return by April 15th to claim your 2009 refund checks. This is for federal income tax refunds only.

2009 Income Tax Refund

“Refunds totaling just over $917 million may be waiting for an estimated 984,400 taxpayers who did not file a federal income tax return for 2009, the Internal Revenue Service announced today. However, to collect the money, a return for 2009 must be filed with the IRS no later than Monday, April 15, 2013.”

“By failing to file a return, people stand to lose more than refund of taxes withheld or paid during 2009. In addition, many low-and-moderate income workers may not have claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). For 2009, the credit is worth as much as $5,657. The EITC helps individuals and families whose incomes are below certain thresholds.”

More details available at the IRS website. If you need assistance filing your 2009 Income Tax Return, contact Hot Springs Tax Services for help.

2012 Income Tax Return, When to file

 When should you file your 2012 Income Tax Return?2012 Income Tax Return

The tax law sets deadlines for filing 2012 income tax returns. However, there is room to maneuver, and the time you choose to file depends on your personal situation. Here are some guidelines to help you decide on the best time for you to file your return.

File early

The filing season for 2012 income tax returns officially opened in end of January 2013 when the IRS began to accept electronically-filed returns. Most individuals do not file before the beginning of February in order to receive information returns, such as W-2s and 1099s, which are usually sent to taxpayers at the end of January; this information is needed to complete the return.

There are some compelling reasons to file as early as possible, once the necessary information is available:

• To receive a tax refund. If you overpaid your 2012 taxes, the longer you wait, the longer the government has the use of your money on an interest-free basis. Usually, you can expect to receive your refund within 72 hours after IRS acknowledges receipt of your e-filed return, or three to four weeks after mailing a paper return. However, the IRS has recently indicated that some refunds may be delayed a week or two due to security measures against fraud.

• To apply a refund to 2012 IRA or HSA contributions. You can direct the IRS to transfer your refund directly to an IRA or Health Savings Account (HSA) for 2012, assuming you are eligible to make a contribution. If you want the refund to be used for a contribution that will be deducted on the 2012 income tax return, the return must be filed early enough to ensure that the transfer is complete before April 15, 2013, the deadline for a 2012 contribution. Use Form 8888 to indicate the account to which you want your refund transferred; you can split the refund into as many as three accounts.

• To get the filing obligation behind you. Many taxpayers dread income tax filing, so the sooner they complete the task, the better off they feel.

April 15

The deadline for filing the 2012 income tax return is April 15, 2013. The majority of taxpayers file by this date; it avoids the need to request a filing extension.

Even if you normally might ask for an extension because you don’t get around to completing the return by this date, you may have to force yourself to do so in certain situations, such as:

• Needing a completed tax return for financial aid purposes if you, your spouse, or your child is in or will attend college.

• Needing a completed tax return if you want to refinance your mortgage.

If, for any reason, you want more time, you have to request a filing extension by April 15. This is done on Form 4868. But beware: The extension only gives you more time to file the return, not to pay taxes owed. If you obtain a filing extension, pay as much of the tax you owe to minimize or avoid underpayment penalties.

October 15

The final day to file your 2012 income tax return is Oct. 15, 2012, assuming you’ve received a filing extension. If you file after this date, you’ll owe late filing penalties.

This date is also the last day to file electronically. If you miss the deadline, you’ll have to submit a paper return.

2012 income tax efile

There are no IRS indications or taxpayer anecdotes to show that filing by this date creates any additional audit exposure. So take advantage of this extra time to file if you need it for such reasons as:

• Family problems. If there’s an illness, a move, or other personal issues distracting you, take the extra time—to October 15—to file the return.

• Obtaining missing information. For example, if you’re an owner in an S corporation, partnership, or limited liability company, you may not receive until September 15 the Schedule K-1 indicating the share of income and expenses you claim on your return.

• Funding a SEP retirement plan if you are self-employed.You may not have the cash before this date to make your contribution.

Final thought: When in doubt about the best time to file your return, talk to a tax advisor in your area or online.

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